Fuller's wedding venues with a historic twist

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Choosing a venue is a crucial first step of planning your wedding and the right venue is a key setting the perfect tone for your big day.

In recent years the pub has risen in popularity as a stunning yet affordable place to celebrate your day – but did you know there’s more to a pub wedding at Fuller’s than meets the eye, from spooky twists to famous customers of old, discover some quirky historical twists that will make sure your big day is one your guests will remember.

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If you want to keep company with one of the most famous couples in history, there is no better place to do it than The Gun. Set on the banks of the River Thames in  London’s Docklands, it’s an historic gem amidst a glass metropolis and was once the meeting place for Lord Nelson and Lady Emma Hamilton, who’d meet one another in our now private dining room for stolen moments of romance. And, when he wasn’t in the arms of his beloved, he could often be found at The Wykeham Arms on his way to Portsmouth -  a pub situated in the then red light district of the area (his secret’s safe with us!) 

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Pictured above: The Gun, Docklands

If you’re determined not to be defeated when it comes to finding your perfect wedding venue, join us at The Castle in Harrow where Sir Winston Churchill used to enjoy a drink at the bar. One of his favourite tipples being a glass of Pol Roger Champagne, the perfect accompaniment to the perfect wedding  – or if you’re looking to share a space with some slightly shadier characters, there’s no better place to do it than at The Star Tavern in Belgravia where the great train robbery of 1963 was planned – the perfect place to have your heart stolen!  

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Pictured above: The Castle, Harrow

But it’s not just politicians and thieves who’ve patronised our pubs – we’re welcomed all walks of life from royalty, with Queen Elizabeth 1st rumoured to be a secret customer at the Ye Old Mitre, to thespians and playwrights of old with Charles Dickens regularly visiting The Lamb and Flag in Covent Garden, Graham Greene, Ernest Hemingway, Dylan Thomas and William Morris drinking at The Dove in Hammersmith and Byron, Shelley and Keats regularly frequenting The Flask in Highgate.

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Pictured above: The Dove, Hammersmith

And that’s not all The Flask has to offer, for those looking for a wedding with a spooky twist, it also lays claim to being one of the most haunted pubs in London with a story of unrequited love causing the haunting when a young Spanish barmaid feel in love with the married landlord, upon being rejected her lifeless body was found the next day hanging in the cellar – and since then, the ghost of the barmaid has been seen wandering the pub after dark, trapped forever in her heartbreak.

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Pictured above: The Flask, Highgate

On the subject of things that go bump in the night, the cellars of The Viaduct in Farringdon is said to be haunted by prisoners of the old Newgate and The Bull Hotel was the scene of a brutal slaughter during the Monmouth Rebellion – what more murderous way to make sure yours is a wedding your guests won’t forget in a hurry! 

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Pictured above: The Viaduct Tavern, Farringdon

Our buildings themselves hold history too – The Counting House in the city was partly built on a roman basilica and The Bear in is the oldest pub in Oxford, the perfect place for your new chapter.

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Pictured above: The Counting House, Cornhill

So whether it’s sipping Champagne with Churchill, saying I do with delinquents, toasting with thieves or remembering a day fit for royalty, you’ll find a story in every Fuller’s pub and the perfect place for a day that goes down in history. 

Our teams are on hand to help the whole way. Expect first-class hospitality, exceptional food and drink, and dependable Events Managers to make your event seamless and special: Make an enquiry

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